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HIV and AIDS

The Challenge

Since the creation of the Global Fund over 20 years ago, our partnership has achieved what was once considered impossible. Efforts by communities, governments, civil society, the private sector and global health partners have resulted in extraordinary progress in the fight against HIV. Globally, new HIV infections declined from 2.2 million in 2010 to 1.5 million in 2021, and the expansion of treatment has led to a 50% reduction in AIDS-related deaths over this period. But the COVID-19 pandemic pushed us off track.

The world missed every single global HIV target in 2020, and at the end of 2021 we still had not achieved every 2020 target. Vulnerable groups, especially children and adolescent girls and young women, are still being left behind. In 2021, only 52% of the children infected with HIV globally were getting the lifesaving treatment they need. In sub-Saharan Africa, adolescent girls and young women are three times as likely to acquire HIV as adolescent boys and young men.

This year, with the Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment conference, the world has an opportunity to invest more to protect our hard-won gains and support countries in their efforts to revitalize and sustain the fight against HIV and AIDS.

Trends in new HIV infections
In countries where the Global Fund invests

HIV and AIDS by the Numbers:

Funding

  • The Global Fund provides 30% of all international financing for HIV programs.
  • We have invested US$24.2 billion in programs to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS as of June 2022.
  • We have invested US$5 billion in TB/HIV programs as of June 2022.

Prevention

  • 12.5m people were reached with HIV prevention services in 2021.
  • Around 670,000 HIV-positive mothers received medicine to keep themselves alive and prevent transmission of HIV to their babies in 2021.

Testing and Treatment

  • 23.3m people on antiretroviral therapy for HIV in 2021.
  • 70.8 million HIV tests were taken in 2021 in countries where the Global Fund invests.
    • 12.6 million of these HIV tests were taken by priority and key populations, including infants, adolescent girls and young women, adolescent boys and young men, gay men and other men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people, people who inject drugs, people in prisons, and other vulnerable populations.

Read more about HIV in our Results Report

See more HIV Data on the Data Explorer

Our Response

The Global Fund provides 30% of all international financing for HIV programs and has invested US$24.2 billion in programs to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS and US$5 billion in TB/HIV programs as of June 2022. Since 2020, we have also stepped up support to countries to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on the HIV response.

Our investments in the fight against HIV are having an impact. In countries where the Global Fund invests, AIDS-related deaths have been reduced by 70% and new infections have been reduced by 54% since 2002. AIDS-related death rates – deaths as a proportion of the population – have dropped by 74% between 2002 and 2020.

Trends in AIDS-related deaths
In countries where the Global Fund invests

Treatment, Care and Support

Together with PEPFAR and other partners, we are making significant progress toward reaching WHO’s “treat all” guidance and the UNAIDS “95-95-95” strategy. Those efforts have significantly increased the number of people living with HIV who know their HIV status, the number of people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the number of people on ART who have a suppressed viral load (when the amount of HIV in a person’s blood becomes so low that it is undetectable). In 2021, the number of people on antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) in Global Fund-supported countries rose to 75%, and 69% of people living with HIV had a suppressed viral load.

We also support multimonth dispensing of prevention, care and treatment products (over three months of medicine at a time), as well as community programs for ART delivery, adherence support, community leadership, engagement and treatment literacy.

Prevention

The Global Fund has steadily increased investments in HIV prevention, from US$752 million in the 2018-2020 period to more than US$1 billion in the 2021-2023 period. We are also investing more in high-impact prevention measures such as HIV self-testing, condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Between 2021 and 2023, the Global Fund is investing more than US$140 million in condom programs – representing 17% of our HIV prevention budget.

As well as these investments, we support countries to focus their efforts on locations where HIV is most prevalent and on people with the greatest HIV prevention needs – key populations and adolescent girls and young women, and their sexual partners – so they have the tools, knowledge and power to protect themselves from acquiring HIV. We also work with partners to make HIV prevention options more accessible in the spaces where people need rapid access to them. By investing in community-led monitoring, we support communities affected by HIV to monitor the accessibility, quality, acceptability and affordability of health services, so that these services are integrated and centered around the people who use them.

Adolescent girls and young women continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV. We have significantly increased our investments for this group, focusing on the 13 priority countries where HIV burden is highest. In 2021, 4.4 million adolescent girls and young women were reached with HIV prevention programs in these 13 countries – a 133% increase compared to 2020.

One crucial strategy in the battle against HIV is preventing transmission from mothers to babies. In countries where the Global Fund invests, in 2021 around 81% of mothers living with HIV received treatment to keep themselves healthy and prevent the virus from infecting their babies, compared to only 45% in 2010.

The Global Fund’s market shaping strategy has led to enormous savings in ARVs, enabling countries to put even more people on treatment.

  • In 2000, a one-year supply of antiretroviral therapy cost more than US$10,000; it can now cost as low as US$66 per year (as of mid-2020).
  • 7.7 million people were receiving ARVs every month through the Pooled Procurement Mechanism in 2020. Through leveraging economies of scale, working with partners and negotiating directly with manufacturers, the cost of ARVs dropped by 50% between 2014 and 2020.

Read the Latest Results Report

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Published: 12 September 2022